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Getting Back to Work After COVID-19

By Chris Richmond
Originally submitted to WorkBoat Magazine / November 2020

Chris Richmond, Allen Insurance and Financial

When the pandemic hit, you were probably looking for ways to save money as the economy ground to a halt. Changes in your insurance policy can reflect a lower premium, but can also affect your coverage. As you start to get back in to business, take a look at any changes you may have made to your insurance policy and see if you need to undo them.

As the pandemic hit, some of the first calls I received from clients were requests to remove navigation from their commercial vessels. Their business slowed down and there was no work for the boats, so this was an obvious way to see some immediate relief in their insurance premium. As the economy starts back up again and you see demand and work for your vessels, make sure to have lay up removed from your policy. While the boat is insured at the dock, during lay up the moment you drop the lines coverage ceases unless you have added navigation back to the policy.

Business owners also sought savings on their insurance bill by reducing the annual projected payroll for their workers compensation or USL&H. As renewals came along during the economic downturn, business reduced their workforce and renewals in WC and USL&H reflected this. As business picks up again and workers who had been laid off are brought back, your annual projected payroll will increase. You can wait until the audit at the end of the policy term and get hit with a large additional premium or you can contact your agent and report the increase in payroll. This will result in spreading out the increase in premium over the remaining term of your policy.

Finally, if you have been shut down for a period of time and equipment has been idle, be sure to do your due diligence and make sure all works as it should. Routine maintenance may have been missed or deferred. Inspection dates could have been missed for safety equipment or log books could be out of date for safety review. Take the time to clean up these area before a fine comes your way.

Starting business back up means getting both customers and your employees back in the door − but don’t forget to contact your insurance agent as well. He or she should always be happy to hear from you and help keep your policy up to date.

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Pollution Liability: More Than Just the Clean Up

By Chris Richmond
Originally submitted to WorkBoat Magazine / October 2020

Chris Richmond, Allen Insurance and Financial

Most commercial hull policies have a pollution exclusion clause attached. You can often get a buy back endorsement added but the coverages on this vary from company to company and often the clause will not cover what you really need to. What you really need is a stand-alone pollution policy.

A pollution policy not only covers spills related to the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 but also claims brought under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). Remember, pollution is not only petroleum spills; they can also be spills or discharge of other hazardous materials stored or transported on your vessel. You can have just as much problem with a chemical spill as an oil spill.

And don’t think that that barge you tow (the one without an engine or bunker fuel) is safe from pollution claims. What if you have a fuel storage container on deck that somehow ends up overboard? You now have a pollution claim. Should your tow come off and the barge has a collision or allusion − causing a fuel spill − you now have a pollution claim.

After the spill is contained and cleaned up, who is going to pay for your defense costs? As you are well aware, this is a part of liability policies and are key as potential litigation claims can drag on and defense costs mount. Whether or not you are found liable, your defense costs can add up quickly. Having these covered by your insurance policy is very important.

And what if your spill was a total accident? Will that stop any fines or penalties imposed upon you but state or federal authorities? Don’t count on it. A pollution policy can provide coverage for fines which may be imposed.

The only thing worse than the actual spill is the image on television or social media of oil-coated birds on the beach. Allowing the public to know that you are doing your best to take care of the situation can go a long way.

While you may never have to use your pollution policy, the coverage it provides for that one time will pay off in the long run. A stand-alone pollution policy is an important part of your vessel’s coverage and in some instances is required by the Coast Guard’s Certificate of Financial Reasonability (COFR) program. Have a talk with your insurance agent to find out more.

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On-Demand Webcast: Winds of Change: How Offshore Wind Farms Will Change the Landscape of Maritime Workers’ Compensation

Offshore Wind WebcastWind energy is poised to eventually be the dominant source of power in the United States.

As companies ramp up their workforce to support activities related to wind farm construction and maintenance, it’s critical to understand the various workers’ compensation laws that impact this sector. In this webcast, our Dan Bookham joins colleagues from American Equity Underwriters to discuss:

  • The various workers’ compensation laws that impact the wind energy sector
  • Jurisdiction issues unique to offshore wind farms
  • Old laws that will be interpreted to meet new circumstances

View the webcast: https://loom.ly/bbj7q4w

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Checklist: Winter Storage for Boats

Source: PatriotInsuranceco.com

winter-storage-for-boats-scaled-2-1080x675Sadly, boating season will come to an end soon, and Old Man Winter will be paving the way for snowmobiles. Winter storage for boats takes some careful planning. If you follow a checklist, winterizing your boat can be easy, ensuring your boat will be in great shape come spring.

For safe winter storage for your boat, follow our checklist:

Inspect for damage.

  • Thoroughly inspect the boat for any damage. Repair now, if possible.
  • Check electrical systems and appliances to make sure they are functioning properly (make repairs before storing the boat, if possible).
  • Check the battery to make sure it is fully charged before storing.

Prep the fuel system.

  • Fill the fuel tank but leave enough room for expansion.
  • Treat the fuel with a stabilizer, then run the engine for 10 minutes to get it circulating throughout the engine.
  • Seal the fuel valves.

Winterize the engine.

  • Change the oil and replace filters.
  • Flush the engine with fresh water, then let it drain.
  • Wash the engine with soap and water. Rinse thoroughly.
  • Fog the engine cylinders with an aerosol fogging solution.
  • Lubricate the engine’s grease fittings.

Flush the cooling system.

  • Drain any remaining coolant.
  • Run a less toxic propylene glycol antifreeze through the system.

Clean inside and out.

  • Clean the boat inside and out, removing any plant life or barnacles.
  • Remove any valuables from inside the boat.
  • Take out any food or drinks.
  • Bring home any cushions and store them in a cool, dry place.

Store your boat.

  • Remove the battery and store it in a safe, dry spot.
  • Consider purchasing a dehumidifier for the storage area to help prevent mildew.
  • Lock your boat (and leave a key with the marina manager, if applicable).
  • Cover and store your boat.
  • Check your boat periodically or have the marina check it and report to you.

Then, when spring comes around, make sure you have the right protection for your boat. Talk to an Allen Insurance representative about boat insurance.

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Chris Richmond Elected to Board of Directors of Maine Marine Trades Association

Chris Richmond

Chris Richmond

Chris Richmond, a member of the marine insurance division of Allen Insurance and Financial, has been elected to a three-year term on the board of directors of the Maine Marine Trades Association.
Richmond, based in the company’s Camden office, is a former schooner captain who maintains his USCG 100-ton master’s license. He specializes in marine insurance, working with boat yards, builders and owners across the U.S.
Richmond has been with Allen Insurance and Financial since 2011. He is a graduate of The American University in Washington, D.C., and the Landing School of Boat Building and Design, where he serves on the school’s program advisory board.